Erzsebet Szatmari, PhD

Erzsebet Szatmari, PhD

Research Scientist
Neuronal Signal Transduction

One Max Planck Way
Jupiter, FL 33458
561-972-9210

Researcher Bio

Before joining Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) in 2012, Erzsebet was a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Yasuda’s lab at Duke University Medical Center, where she identified the role of a brain-specific protein, centaurin α-1 (CentA1) in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Her work was supported by a Ruth K. Broad Biomedical Fellowship and an NIH F32 award. Erzsebet’s current research in Dr. Yasuda’s lab at MPFI builds on her previous finding that in neurons exposed to Aβ, CentA1 recruits Elk-1 to mitochondria in a Ras-dependent manner, leading to synaptic dysfunction. Using transgenic mouse models of AD, Erzsebet applies state of art molecular screening, imaging, behavioral and biochemical techniques to study signaling pathways of synaptic dysfunction in vivo.

Erzsebet received her PhD in Cell Biology from Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania and Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary (joint program). In 2003 she joined Dr. Michal Hetman’s lab at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, Louisville. During her training in Dr. Hetman’s lab she identified the neuroprotective role of a brain-specific scaffolding protein, KSR-1 against DNA-damaging agents. She also identified the role of GSK-3β in excitotoxic cell death.

Erzsebet shares her passion for neuroscience by mentoring high school and undergraduate student interns and high school science teachers.

Research Interests

  • Signaling mechanism that mediate synaptic dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders

Education

  • Postdoctoral training at Duke University Medical Center, Department of Neurobiology (2007-2012)
  • Postdoctoral training at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, Louisville (2003-2006)
  • PhD. in Cell Biology from Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania and Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary (joint program) (2003)